Bug Out Bag

3GunPrepper

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Can we get a BOB thread going? My wife and I have BOB’s but they havent been touched in years. I started revamping them and diving back into the gear scene.

1.) What is in your BOB?
2.) What is your favorite gear brand?
3.) What is your best kept BOB secret that most people don’t do.
4.) Preferred protection?
5.) Bug in or Bug out?

1- I’ll list when I get home.
2- 5.11/Arc’teryx
3- Vaseline soaked cotton balls jammed in an empty rx bottle.
4- Suppressed 300aac pistol and a p365xl.
5- Currently, out. Next home will be off the grid, self sustaining, and we will be bugging in.
 

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keith089

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I have a get home bag. I have no property to run too, so I’m going home where I have everything I need, if it goes south I hope I can still hook up my camper and get out . If not , I will be happy to die in a home that I raised my family in and gave blood sweat and tears for.
Just my thoughts
 

Klif

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I have a get home bag in each of our 3 vehicles. We are coming home regardless. Mine has been helpful a few times. I am diabetic and my sugar can drop dangerously low on short notice. We were at a car show, about 30 miles from home, and the show was in the process of closing down and all the food vendors were gone. I felt myself starting to crash, wife didn't have anything in her bag so we made it back to the truck, flipped open the bag and I had a tube of glucose tablets right on top. Popped a couple and felt better almost immediately. Dug a little deeper and had water (warm) and some lifeboat crackers. Ate a couple of those and drank the water and was as good as new. If not for that it could have gotten really serious quickly. Got home, replaced the glucose with a fresh tube, replaced the water, replaced the crackers and the bag is good to go again.

I did notice the box of 9mm ammo I had put in there was needing replacement since I changed out my EDC weapon to a Glock 30S in .45 ACP, so replaced the 9mm with .45 (in all 3 bags) and now I'm good on all fronts.

We aren't going anywhere when the SHTF. Got no place to go and being north of 70 years old I'm not up to a long trek. Our home place is equipped with a well, lots of food storage and plenty of guns and ammo to defend the place with. We will be the rally point for the family members and will go from a house hold of 2 people and 2 old dogs to a stand alone place for 12 people and 3 or 4 dogs. Also have ample supply of fire extinguishers, with at least one in every room and bigger ones in the shed. Fire is a scary thing and you have to fight it down or lose everything.

If the rapture comes and I am gone, everyone who might be left behind knows where everything is and they are welcome to it.
 

hondoptc

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Here is a BoB inventory I have developed over the past 10 years or so. If it can't be downloaded email me at hondoptc@gmail.com and I will send you the excel spreadsheet.

This is an older version from when I was commuting weekly and I needed a plan to get home (about 500 miles away).

I have since focused more on "bugging in" and hurricane preparations since I now live in a hurricane zone.

Lessons I have learned in regard to preparedness:
  • Plan for the most probable scenario, in my case a hurricane
  • Train with your gear, get comfortable, and train some more.
  • Be practical, avoid primitive survival stuff. Bushcraft is fun but why not just carry 5 bic lighters in a ziploc etc.?
  • Build a network of like minded people (here is a great place to start - https://www.americancontingency.com/)
  • Focus on the essentials (Comms, water, medical, food, security, etc.)
  • Be physically fit (your most important tool is your body)
  • If you plan on bugging out you will need a place that is set up to sustain you (in other words, bugging out without a destination is probably a bad idea)
For me, preparedness is a mindset and not just a bag of goodies. Be aware of your surroundings, understand your neighborhood, anticipate and develop strategies to care for yourself and your family. Don't stand out, blend in and keep a low profile (Be the gray man).
 

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RiverBend

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Retired, so get home might be a 8 mile trek from The Golden Coral, or such, In Forsyth county so not that many hoodrats trolling for old folks to victimize. So my get home, unless on vacation or way off, is a get away from me tool, and 100 pieces to feed it. That should be sufficient for us anyway.
 

Tikker

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I'll play.

1.) 1 spare set of clothes & 2 spare pair of socks; folding solar panel with charging pack that supports AA & AAA; Smoke grenades in multiple colors depending on situation; Lite weight netting & fishing gear for trot line; Fire starter & lighters; Compass; Water filter; Tarp; Insect repellent 100% deet; Boy Scout cooking set; Rope; Anarchist Cookbook for reading; Leatherman multi-tool; Bushman knife; Small windup radio; Silver coins; Heavy duty black latex gloves; & Protean block ration. I know I'm forgetting stuff, just going off memory but it's pretty much the main items I keep in my "bug out/vacation" bag. My daily bag is just basic essentials to survive walking home.

I have other bag's but they are loaded with items for my wife & two boys, but I usually don't load them till we plan to leave the house for vacation. Since kids grow fast, depending when we need it the diaper size might be too small as well as their clothes. Thankfully we're out of the formula stage, that was always a big concern for me.

2.) Any quality bag that isn't tactical looking, has good support, & on sale. I'm not picky as long as it won't fall apart on me & not made in China.

3.) Trick firecracker I used to use to prank people with, but now I keep them in a little Ziploc bag with some string, electrical tape, & small nails to attach to doors, windows, or branches in case I'm forced to sleep in an unsafe area. https://www.thefireworkssuperstore.com/shop/pulling-fireworks

I also keep a spray can of deer urine to use as a deterrence. Spray some on a door/vehicle handle, window sill, or around the foliage/clutter where you want to stash your gear.This stuff with a little Vaseline on a door handle would repulse pretty much anyone from entering that room. A quick spritz on the door frame would keep the smell closer to head level. Adds an extra layer to keep people finding you or your stuff.

4.) For "get home" its whatever I'm carrying that day + 4 spare mags of ammo, 2 on me & 2 in the bag. For "vacation/bug out" it's my AK47 (currently collecting parts for a lightweight AR15 build to use 5.56 to carry more ammo), Sig Tacops 1911 w-Tirant 45, M&P9c for the wife, & my P229 in 40 since I have a ton of 60gr Liberty Defense ammo --> https://www.ammoboard.com/handgun-a...-hollow-point-fragmenting-case-of-500-rounds/.

5.) Bug in - I only daily carry a small "get home" bag, with two young boys I won't take any chance of moving them in any hostile environment unless forced to do so. I know the area I'm in now pretty well, so trying to go somewhere else that I marginally know when everyone else has the same idea seems pointless to me. The shortage of gas/supplies on the road would not be my idea of getting away from danger.

If anything I would just move into an empty house close by that'll be easier to defend. This way I can systematically move my items from one place to another so I don't have to leave anything behind.
 

3GunPrepper

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I have a get home bag. I have no property to run too, so I’m going home where I have everything I need, if it goes south I hope I can still hook up my camper and get out . If not , I will be happy to die in a home that I raised my family in and gave blood sweat and tears for.
Just my thoughts
I cant wait until we're able to move to a more remote location and bug in.
 

3GunPrepper

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I have a get home bag in each of our 3 vehicles. We are coming home regardless. Mine has been helpful a few times. I am diabetic and my sugar can drop dangerously low on short notice. We were at a car show, about 30 miles from home, and the show was in the process of closing down and all the food vendors were gone. I felt myself starting to crash, wife didn't have anything in her bag so we made it back to the truck, flipped open the bag and I had a tube of glucose tablets right on top. Popped a couple and felt better almost immediately. Dug a little deeper and had water (warm) and some lifeboat crackers. Ate a couple of those and drank the water and was as good as new. If not for that it could have gotten really serious quickly. Got home, replaced the glucose with a fresh tube, replaced the water, replaced the crackers and the bag is good to go again.

I did notice the box of 9mm ammo I had put in there was needing replacement since I changed out my EDC weapon to a Glock 30S in .45 ACP, so replaced the 9mm with .45 (in all 3 bags) and now I'm good on all fronts.

We aren't going anywhere when the SHTF. Got no place to go and being north of 70 years old I'm not up to a long trek. Our home place is equipped with a well, lots of food storage and plenty of guns and ammo to defend the place with. We will be the rally point for the family members and will go from a house hold of 2 people and 2 old dogs to a stand alone place for 12 people and 3 or 4 dogs. Also have ample supply of fire extinguishers, with at least one in every room and bigger ones in the shed. Fire is a scary thing and you have to fight it down or lose everything.

If the rapture comes and I am gone, everyone who might be left behind knows where everything is and they are welcome to it.
Glad to hear you made it! Def now considering a get home bag beyond my pocket dump and some mags.
 

3GunPrepper

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Here is a BoB inventory I have developed over the past 10 years or so. If it can't be downloaded email me at hondoptc@gmail.com and I will send you the excel spreadsheet.

This is an older version from when I was commuting weekly and I needed a plan to get home (about 500 miles away).

I have since focused more on "bugging in" and hurricane preparations since I now live in a hurricane zone.

Lessons I have learned in regard to preparedness:
  • Plan for the most probable scenario, in my case a hurricane
  • Train with your gear, get comfortable, and train some more.
  • Be practical, avoid primitive survival stuff. Bushcraft is fun but why not just carry 5 bic lighters in a ziploc etc.?
  • Build a network of like minded people (here is a great place to start - https://www.americancontingency.com/)
  • Focus on the essentials (Comms, water, medical, food, security, etc.)
  • Be physically fit (your most important tool is your body)
  • If you plan on bugging out you will need a place that is set up to sustain you (in other words, bugging out without a destination is probably a bad idea)
For me, preparedness is a mindset and not just a bag of goodies. Be aware of your surroundings, understand your neighborhood, anticipate and develop strategies to care for yourself and your family. Don't stand out, blend in and keep a low profile (Be the gray man).
Great list my dude
 
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