Review for AR Armorer’s services at TruPrep

cmshoot

Default rank 5000+ posts
Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
17,873
Reaction score
30,506
Location
Dallas GA
milspec
tight enough to work,loose enough to work dirty..not the best or most accurate,but will always send lead in the direction of people and places who need to receive it.. ;)
i was not sure if you had a precision one built or not.

That is not what “milspec” means as I am using it.
 

poopdaddy

Default rank 5000+ posts Supporter
The Hen that laid the Golden Legos
Joined
Nov 2, 2012
Messages
9,255
Reaction score
8,360
Location
griffin ga
That is not what “milspec” means as I am using it.
milsec is the spec the military uses. so it is a military only specification. no one other than the military will ever get milspec. you can use milspec parts. milspec is tight enough to work and loose enough to work dirty. even the military has special armorers that build their competition rifles. everything else must work in harsh conditions. thats why the ak is such a good rifle. its not accurate for crap,but it always works.
bonus to milspec parts,
chrome lined barrels ..not as accurate but very durable.
phosphate coatings..resist weather
quality aluminum..
hardened steel. does not wear out prematurely.
but never forget...its shoot in the sand,shoot in the jungle,shoot in the arctic,and shoot in air conditioned indoor ranges...
i am just picking on you a little. dont get upset. i can believe he built you a great ar15. just not real sure why anyone would not build their own. thats just me and i am extremely mechanical.
i guess there are plenty of reasons. but i am glad she runs good for ya....
i wont pick anymore....
 

EugenFJR

Default rank <4000 posts
ODT Junkie!
Joined
Nov 14, 2012
Messages
3,897
Reaction score
2,231
Location
Powder Springs, Hiram, Ga.
All of this mil spec talk makes me think of this...

Screenshot_20220522-190948.png
 

Burning Love

Default rank <4000 posts Supporter
tat-man
Joined
Jul 19, 2010
Messages
3,969
Reaction score
2,599
Location
Atlanta
milsec is the spec the military uses. so it is a military only specification. no one other than the military will ever get milspec. you can use milspec parts. milspec is tight enough to work and loose enough to work dirty. even the military has special armorers that build their competition rifles. everything else must work in harsh conditions. thats why the ak is such a good rifle. its not accurate for crap,but it always works.
bonus to milspec parts,
chrome lined barrels ..not as accurate but very durable.
phosphate coatings..resist weather
quality aluminum..
hardened steel. does not wear out prematurely.
but never forget...its shoot in the sand,shoot in the jungle,shoot in the arctic,and shoot in air conditioned indoor ranges...
i am just picking on you a little. dont get upset. i can believe he built you a great ar15. just not real sure why anyone would not build their own. thats just me and i am extremely mechanical.
i guess there are plenty of reasons. but i am glad she runs good for ya....
i wont pick anymore....
Your extra chromosome is showing again.
 

cmshoot

Default rank 5000+ posts
Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
17,873
Reaction score
30,506
Location
Dallas GA
milsec is the spec the military uses. so it is a military only specification. no one other than the military will ever get milspec. you can use milspec parts. milspec is tight enough to work and loose enough to work dirty. even the military has special armorers that build their competition rifles. everything else must work in harsh conditions. thats why the ak is such a good rifle. its not accurate for crap,but it always works.
bonus to milspec parts,
chrome lined barrels ..not as accurate but very durable.
phosphate coatings..resist weather
quality aluminum..
hardened steel. does not wear out prematurely.
but never forget...its shoot in the sand,shoot in the jungle,shoot in the arctic,and shoot in air conditioned indoor ranges...
i am just picking on you a little. dont get upset. i can believe he built you a great ar15. just not real sure why anyone would not build their own. thats just me and i am extremely mechanical.
i guess there are plenty of reasons. but i am glad she runs good for ya....
i wont pick anymore....

I did not say that I used milspec parts. I stated that I used milspec assembly techniques.

You are incorrect in part of that. There are plenty of milspec parts that are available on the civilian market. For instance, a Colt BCG sold through Primary Arms is the exact milspec BCG they supply in their rifles and carbines for the military.
 

cmshoot

Default rank 5000+ posts
Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
17,873
Reaction score
30,506
Location
Dallas GA
All of this mil spec talk makes me think of this...

View attachment 4467670

It doesn’t
All of this mil spec talk makes me think of this...

View attachment 4467670

Milspec does not mean what you imply that it means.

Milspec does not mean it was meant by the lowest bidder. It means that the items/parts meet a specific and stringent criteria. The company that gets the contract is usually the one that meets, or exceeds all those specs, AND was the lowest bidder.......but not always.

If the only criteria for milspec was "lowest bidder", the US military would be using Hi-Point handguns, and Del-Ton AR's.

In all my years in the Corps, with the last year spent out at Stone Bay Ranges, I never saw a BCG fail. I see failure and problem BCG's weekly in the civilian world. That's the difference between milspec and not.
 

cmshoot

Default rank 5000+ posts
Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
17,873
Reaction score
30,506
Location
Dallas GA
I use the same assembly techniques and tools for the general purpose AR's that I build as I do the "precision" or Sniper-intended ones.

I had a .338 Lapua AR that I assembled. I ran it out to 2500yds successfully, using factory Lapua ammunition. I used the same assembly techniques, and attention to detail, that I use in every AR I build.

I've built AR's that were intended for precision use in 5.56, 6.5 Grendel, .308, 6.5CM, and .260 Remington. All were well under 1MOA guns, and had no issues ringing steel out to 1,000yds with the right ammo and shooter. Several of them were run out to distances in excess of 1,000yds. Again, I used the exact same assembly techniques for those AR's that I use in all AR's.
 

User170512

Default rank <4000 posts Supporter
ODT Junkie!
Joined
Jun 28, 2011
Messages
3,770
Reaction score
3,389
Location
Macon, GA
It doesn’t


Milspec does not mean what you imply that it means.

Milspec does not mean it was meant by the lowest bidder. It means that the items/parts meet a specific and stringent criteria. The company that gets the contract is usually the one that meets, or exceeds all those specs, AND was the lowest bidder.......but not always.

If the only criteria for milspec was "lowest bidder", the US military would be using Hi-Point handguns, and Del-Ton AR's.

In all my years in the Corps, with the last year spent out at Stone Bay Ranges, I never saw a BCG fail. I see failure and problem BCG's weekly in the civilian world. That's the difference between milspec and not.
How do you usually see them fail in civy hands?
 

cmshoot

Default rank 5000+ posts
Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
17,873
Reaction score
30,506
Location
Dallas GA
How do you usually see them fail in civy hands?

Bolt lugs sheering off when made from 9310 steel (milspec is C-158).

Gas block screws sheering off due to the fact that they are not milspec Grade 8 bolts.

Gas keys coming loose due to improper torque and/or staking.

Poor fit between the gas key and the carrier, allowing gas leakage (especially in NiB BCG's). If the surfaces weren't machined properly, you can still have gas leakage, even when the gas key is otherwise installed properly and to spec.

Poor seal between the gas key and gas tube on nitride carriers. Milspec for the gas key is for it to be chrome-lined. Most manufacturers machine the bore in the gas key oversized to compensate for the addition of the chrome lining. Nitride does not add thickness, as it penetrates the surface. Take a gas key intended for chrome-lining, nitride it instead, and you can easily end up with a poor seal and an inefficient gas system.

BCG's that won't seat fully into a receiver, due to a bent carrier, out of spec bolt lugs, or out of spec/bent gas key. Part of milspec for a BCG is that every single one be test-fired. If it won't fit in a receiver, it wasn't test-fired.
 
Top Bottom