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Preparedness checklist?

Curious as to where the 3 days without shelter came from.
Timber Cruiser Timber Cruiser It's 3 hours without shelter. That's basically how long it takes to be debilitated in cold/rainy or hot/humid weather. If it's sunny and 75* you can go a lot longer but I've lived in the hot and lived in the cold and you will be smoked in no time without shelter from the elements.
30 days without food ? I think not ! Maybe the 0 was a typo .

D dpm no, it's about how long the average person can survive without food. They are less strong, more tired, and starting to eat their own muscled at that point. Watch some Alone or similar, and you'll see people going a month with almost no intake.

a pound of fat has ~3500 calories, and that's about 3 days worth of "doing nothing but laying down staying alive" energy. I would venture to guess many of us have more than 10 spare pounds on us at all times.
 
Does anyone have a recommendation for general preparedness? Like stuff to have, skills to have, renewable resources to focus on?

My house is on 7 acres with a well for starters. I feel like thats a good start for privacy, small garden, and a water source.
A little late to the thread but here goes.

Sounds like you have the most expensive part out of the way and you are positioned very nicely!

I have a checklist I have developed over the past 10 years or so, and if you PM me, I will gladly send it to you, no problem. But, the real value is not just collecting stuff. That is actually very easy (if you have the money). The real key is mindset networking and practice.

Here is an excellent resource:

He wrote a couple of books (Concrete Jungle and Prarie Fire) that outline what to do and how to prepare if the SHTF. He is an expert in the field, and I like his approach a lot.

After reading those, you will likely find some areas for improvement, and the rest is just a journey.

Another excellent resource is:

Mike Glover and his team are excellent and he has a similar background to Clay.

The one thread you will see mentioned and stressed from both of them is community and networking. You cannot do it alone, even guys with their resume's.

Community/Networking:
Try this - https://www.americancontingency.com/

This is an online community designed to build networks and relationships. It is not radical and not a militia (despite what the feds tried to say). I have been a member since the start and there is none of the garbage associated with the preparedness community. Just good people (actually vetted) and an exchange of knowledge and mutual aid.

Good luck on your preparedness journey!
 
A little late to the thread but here goes.

Sounds like you have the most expensive part out of the way and you are positioned very nicely!

I have a checklist I have developed over the past 10 years or so, and if you PM me, I will gladly send it to you, no problem. But, the real value is not just collecting stuff. That is actually very easy (if you have the money). The real key is mindset networking and practice.

Here is an excellent resource:

He wrote a couple of books (Concrete Jungle and Prarie Fire) that outline what to do and how to prepare if the SHTF. He is an expert in the field, and I like his approach a lot.

After reading those, you will likely find some areas for improvement, and the rest is just a journey.

Another excellent resource is:

Mike Glover and his team are excellent and he has a similar background to Clay.

The one thread you will see mentioned and stressed from both of them is community and networking. You cannot do it alone, even guys with their resume's.

Community/Networking:
Try this - https://www.americancontingency.com/

This is an online community designed to build networks and relationships. It is not radical and not a militia (despite what the feds tried to say). I have been a member since the start and there is none of the garbage associated with the preparedness community. Just good people (actually vetted) and an exchange of knowledge and mutual aid.

Good luck on your preparedness journey!

Dude thank you so much.
 
Does anyone have a recommendation for general preparedness? Like stuff to have, skills to have, renewable resources to focus on?

My house is on 7 acres with a well for starters. I feel like thats a good start for privacy, small garden, and a water source.
I highly recommend learning homesteads gardening. I’m building a raised bed garden this year and learning how to garden. I would also look into solar power kits to power your home. If you don’t know how to cut down trees for fire wood I highly recommend it. Since you got land you can get some chickens and goats. Goats are used for milk.also if you’re not that good with firearms it might be best if you learned.
 
I highly recommend learning homesteads gardening. I’m building a raised bed garden this year and learning how to garden. I would also look into solar power kits to power your home. If you don’t know how to cut down trees for fire wood I highly recommend it. Since you got land you can get some chickens and goats. Goats are used for milk.also if you’re not that good with firearms it might be best if you learned.

I am in a HOA...cant have chickens or pigs...its a bougie horse community unfortunately. I am planning on buying raise, horse troughs from tractor supply to start a garden. I have a nice spot on the side of my house. I am also looking into solar. Its $30,000 for a tesla wall unfortunately...two battery packs are enough to power a house.
 
I am in a HOA...cant have chickens or pigs...its a bougie horse community unfortunately. I am planning on buying raise, horse troughs from tractor supply to start. I have a nice spot on the side of my house. I am also looking into solar. Its $30,000 for a tesla wall unfortunately...two battery packs are enough to power a house.
Oh that sucks!!! Yea dude there are other options other than the Tesla wall but hoa doesn’t allow solar panels then that might be the way to go. Im looking into land up north. Chickens and goats are easy to tend too and can help with being self-sufficient
 
Oh that sucks!!! Yea dude there are other options other than the Tesla wall but hoa doesn’t allow solar panels then that might be the way to go. Im looking into land up north. Chickens and goats are easy to tend too and can help with being self-sufficient
We just bought us a nice house on 8 acres in the country. It's funny you mention this because chickens and goats are in the plans for the next month. Already making preparations. Fun fact, around the world more people drink goat milk than they do cow milk.
 
some of those guys that were on the TV show Preppers amazed me at their level of readiness. From the go bags to isolated underground bunkers perched on a hilltop with shooting ports and escape tunnels. 7 years worth of food,air filtration,water filtration. very impressive. Not sure what happened to that show but it was entertaining to me.
Now just think about the ones too paranoid to go on the show and what they have. The folks have on the show are the careless ones.
 
Animals need to be fed. If you don't have good grass for a cow, it will not produce enough output to justify it's existence, and then it just becomes a limited supply of meat. Goats are better foragers, but without hay or feed, they need to roam, and the more time you have to spend shepharding them, which is a very time consuming and exposed activity. Chickens can free range, but in a SHTF scenario, there will be a lot of predators (former two and four legged house occupents, wandering and hungry) to deal with. Which means more guard duty. Roosters are good protectors against some types of predation, but can't fend off dogs or motivated cats, and they are also noisy as hell, advertising the chickens' (and your) location as a food source.

So: Before you start thinking of a hobby farm as a food source, consider the amount of work involved in feeding and protecting those animals. Doesn't mean it can't work. It just comes with obstacles that you need to plan for.

Fish, on the other hand, are a source of QUIET protein. If you live near a legally accessible lake, large pond, river, then you should be good to go; stock up on fishing line and hooks. Nature provides the bait. If you can make a pond and stock it with fish that will reproduce readily (bream, catfish), that's a great way to go. Bonus: If the world doesn't fall apart, you get the benefit of recreational fishing.
You forget about the dozens of swimming pools available for re-adaptation
 
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